Exciting news from The Marconi Society! They made history when they announced their newest fellow, Dr. Andrea Goldsmith. Why? Andrea is representing women in STEM as the first female fellow to receive the award in the prize’s 45 year history.

Andrea has been paving the way for women in STEM for decades. (She’s also the first female president of the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers — no big deal!) She wins this award for breaking barriers in a field where it’s just that much harder to succeed as a woman. Her work in tech is impressive, but her dedication to ensuring equity and inclusion in the STEM fields is even more inspiring. 

BY THE NUMBERS: WOMEN IN STEM

Breaking through the silicon ceiling — the barrier for women to advance in tech and engineering — is a huge feat. According to the Society of Women Engineers, only 13% of engineers and 26% of computer scientists in the workforce are women. 

Inherent bias is still a major problem for women across all professions, but is even more prevalent in the sciences. According to the study, 61% of women polled feel that they need to “prove themselves repeatedly to get the same level of respect and recognition as their colleagues.” 

While women have made major strides in STEM, things are still far from equal. So how do we continue working to ensure that girls everywhere have access to the careers and professions that they’re interested in? Women like Andrea. 

Women like Andrea empower other women by achieving new things, continually pushing the boundaries, and going where few women have gone. But we need even more women to lead the way — 32% of women transfer out of STEM degree programs during college.   

We love seeing organizations like the Marconi Society empower and uplift women, especially in such a male dominated field. Highlighting women in STEM encourages girls all over, young and old, to pursue what they are truly passionate about.

Girl power! 💪🏾

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